10 Upending Cyber Security and Malware Facts

10 Upending Cyber Security and Malware Facts
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1.  A cybercriminal, who hacked US-based security think tank Stratfor, used the name of his cat, chewy followed by 123 as his computer password. He was the FBI’s most-wanted list who was easily arrested after the police guessed his password right.

2. The first-ever cyberattack occurred 200 years ago on the national mechanical telegraph system of France. Two trader brothers, François and Joseph Blanc to take advantage of the high-speed network and the information about the market faster.

3. The nuclear intercontinental ballistic missile systems of the US are still run on IBM Series/1 Computer that uses an 8-inch floppy disk that dates back to the 70s. This is because there is no modern software or network that can be used to hack it. They can still be used for another 40 years to come.

4. Matrix Reloaded movie shows in a scene how SSH vulnerability is exposed and hacked. This is when “Nmap” is shown running on Trinity’s computer that finds an open port 22 and logs into the computers. “Nmap”  is a port scanner that finds out what services are run on a network by sending packets.

5. The British Intelligence once hacked into al-Qaeda online magazine website and replaced the bomb-making instructions with a recipe for making cupcakes. The entire operation was called “Operation Cupcake”.

6. A search engine exists that is termed by the CNN as the “Scariest Search Engine”. Its name is Shodan and works differently from any other search engine you have known. Instead of searching for websites, the search engine searches for devices on the internet. It can be used to get information about cameras or other such devices on the internet and hack them.

7. There is a laptop that consists of the world’s six most dangerous and chaotic viruses. It is called “The Persistence of Chaos”. The virus, WannaCry, that recently hit the world’s computers is also on it. It is on sale for more than $1 million.

8. When Iran’s nuclear facilities were hacked, the computer virus that hit their systems played AC/DC’s “Thunderstruck” at high volume.

9. Did you know the famous rootkit virus of 2005 had its roots in Sony music CDs on which Sony had installed the virus. When inserted into the computer, the CD installed software on the computer which couldn’t be uninstalled easily. When Sony was asked to remove the virus, Sony released an uninstaller that further aided in collecting user information. As per Sony, it was unintentional.

10. You are more likely to get a virus from a church website than from a pornography website. The reason: pornography websites are run by entrepreneurs and experts who know how to protect their websites. Church websites are made by owners who are inexperienced and more vulnerable to welcoming a virus on their website without intention.

11. A cybercriminal, who hacked US-based security think tank Stratfor, used the name of his cat, chewy followed by 123 as his computer password. He was the FBI’s most-wanted list who was easily arrested after the police guessed his password right.

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